CITY-STATES     

         During the golden age of Greece the term "Greece" was not yet in use.  The area called Greece today was dotted with various city-states who had no desire to be united into a larger country.  As their name implies, city-states were large areas of land whose inhabitants fell under the rule of the city in the midst.  Powerful lords built their castle-like keeps on the highest point of the city and surrounded them with high walls.  In times of war, those who farmed the surrounding countryside would flee into the city for safety.  Because of this, Athens and the Greek cities were more than just a city; they were the law and protection of the surrounding plains.
         The heart of every Greek city was the agora, the marketplace.  It was the economic, political, and religious lifeblood of the city.  Almost every agora was dotted with statues, temples, public buildings, and trees.  In Athens, the agora is where the Assembly of the People met to vote on city issues.
         There were frequent, city-wide festivals to honor various gods.  Music, drama, and poetry were often exhibited during these, and a multitude of sacrifices made at the temples.

LIFE OF A GREEK BOY

LIFE OF A GREEK GIRL


READ ABOUT GREEK RELIGION

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ABOVE:  The Parthenon in Athens

BELOW:  The Road to Athens