Home      How to Become a Mythology Teacher
 
 
Narcissus and Echo:   One of the great things about being a mythology teacher is teaching how myths have influenced our language through words like "echo" and "narcissistic."
 
 
 
 
 

HOW TO BECOME A MYTHOLOGY TEACHER

I get this question all the time, so I decided to make a page about it!

Advice about Teaching

First, let me get on my soapbox for a minute.  Teaching is a complicated job and to be truly successful, you must enjoy working with young people. Go into teaching because you enjoy young people and want to impact their lives—not because you want to drone on endlessly about your favorite subject. Too many high-school teachers are passionate about what they teach (English, mathematics, mythology), but they are completely frustrated by teenagers! In my opinion, this is completely backward.  No wonder so many students find their education mind-numbingly boring.  Some teachers see students as an obstacle instead of a purpose. Okay. That’s enough preaching from me. Now, on to the info…                                                                                              
Disclaimer:  I know very little about the process of becoming a mythology teacher.  It happened to me completely by accident.  (If you’d like to know more about that experience, read my post “Mythology and Reader's Theater”)  But, without further ado, here is the extent of my knowledge about how to become a mythology teacher.

Teaching Mythology in High School

Mythology courses are a popular high-school English elective.  (I’ve also heard of some schools where the mythology course is taught by a history or Latin teacher.)  So in order to become a mythology teacher on the high-school level, you should pursue a degree in education (probably with an English emphasis) and then apply at a school that has mythology as one of their elective offerings.  Or, even if they don’t, you can add it once you’re on the faculty!

Teaching Mythology at the College Level

Mythology courses are also popular on the college level.  At some universities these are taught by English faculty, but many are taught as part of the World Languages department.  These focus mainly on Greek and Roman mythology and are taught by professors of Latin.  So if this is your desired course, you should attain at least a Master’s degree in either English or Latin and apply to a college or university for employment. Many professors have a Ph.D. in their subject areas, but many courses can be taught with just a Master’s degree. As far as I know, there is not a degree you can get solely in mythological studies.  A degree in Literature or Latin will probably be the best you can do.  Some universities offer a degree in Humanities, which is a study of the classical world (Greece and Rome).         
 
I do teach mythology in high school, but in the past I have been offered a chance to teach a mythology course at a local community college before. They considered my degree, a Master’s degree in Education (English emphasis), sufficient for this.

Teaching Mythology to Adults

Community centers often offer various classes for community members.  If you would like to teach mythology but do not want to pursue a degree, this might be a great way for you to teach an informal mythology class.
 


 
 
 
 


 
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